.



.








Berlin Journals—On the History and Present State of the City #5
On the Constitution
Research, Documents 1989–2017
Elske Rosenfeld, Kerstin Meyer, Joerg Franzbecker
In 1990, a constitution with wide-ranging civil rights was in effect in East Berlin for half a year. These civil rights had been formulated by the citizens’ movements and the opposition at the Central Round Table of the GDR, based on the experiences of the 1989 revolution. In the first parliament of the reunited Berlin, efforts to anchor these expanded political rights in the new constitution were largely defeated. However, a provision for legislation by the people was adopted. As a result, in the state of Berlin laws can be passed directly without the parliament by popular vote. In recent years, two laws have been passed in this way: the public disclosure of municipal water contracts and the preservation of the Tempelhofer Feld. Although a majority of Berliners—in all districts—voted in favor of the latter in May 2014, the governing parties soon tried to overturn this legislation passed by the citizens. In response, a new citizens’ legislative proposal, Volksentscheid Retten, was initiated in 2016 to strengthen legislation by popular vote in the constitution. These two processes, in 1989/90 and 2016, aimed to enable all Berliners to participate in shaping the constitution. This book traces the connection between the two.
96 pages, with a series of images by Elske Rosenfeld

Print Zur Verfassung: November 2017, German, ISBN 978-3-946674-04-7, 7,00 € .Order Online
ePub, PDF Zur Verfassung: coming soon

Research materials



Produced on the occasion of the project Ene Mene Muh und welche Stadt willst Du? Contributions to the Berlin state election 2016, nGbK, 2016/17